Posts tagged art

The purpose of theology - the purpose of any thinking about God - is to make the silences clearer and starker to us, to make the unmeaning - by which I mean those aspects of the divine that will not be reduced to human meanings - more irreducible and more terrible, and thus ultimately more wonderful. This is why art is so often better at theology than theology is.
Christian Wiman, My Bright Abyss, 130.
monsieurleprince:

Louis H. Grimshaw (1870 - 1943) - St. Margarets, Westminster

monsieurleprince:

Louis H. Grimshaw (1870 - 1943) - St. Margarets, Westminster

thegetty:

How do you move 3.5 tons of marble? A flying lion and horse descend on the Getty Villa! 

I love the Getty Villa. Not quite as much as I love the Getty Center, but the Villa is just amazing.

You do not write the best you can for the sake of art, but for the sake of returning your talent increased to the invisible God to use or not use as he sees fit.
Flannery O’Connor

newyorker:

“My first trip to Israel and Palestine was an intuitive leap,” Forsell writes in the book. “Nothing turned out as planned. In this state of confusion, I started photographing the everyday conflict and the people living in it. Alongside the actual attacks, clashes and casualties, there is a conflict going on within each person in Israel and Palestine. Ordinary people are making extraordinary choices to get by. Reinforced by the small things that build up hate and the difficult choices everyone is forced to make, the entire region is pervaded by a certain psychological state of mind. People look, but they don’t see.”

From 2008 to 2010, Linda Forsell photographed life in Israel and Palestine, and her work has recently been published as a book, “Life’s a Blast.”  Click-through to see more images from her collection: http://nyr.kr/LCxKig

You do not write the best you can for the sake of art, but for the sake of returning your talent increased to the invisible God to use or not use as he sees fit.
Flannery O’Connor
In art, either as creators or participators, we are helped to remember some of the glorious things we have forgotten, and some of the terrible things we are asked to endure, we who are children of God by adoption and grace.
Madeleine L’Engle, Walking on Water
It is very important, fundamental, I would say, to learn to love, to really love, to learn the art of true love! In adolescence we pause in front of the mirror and we notice ourselves changing. But if you only look at yourself, you never grow up! You grow up when you no longer let the mirror be the only truth of yourselves but when you let your friends tell you the truth. You will grow up if you are able to make your life a gift to others, not to seek yourselves, but to give yourselves to others: this is the school of love.
Pope Benedict XVI (via matthewclan)
In art, either as creators or participators, we are helped to remember some of the glorious things we have forgotten, and some of the terrible things we are asked to endure, we who are children of God by adoption and grace.
Madeleine L’Engle, Walking on Water

godthings:

“Vulnerability is something we instinctively reject because we are taught from kindergarten on that we must protect ourselves, control our behaviour and our lives. But, in becoming man for us, Christ made himself totally vulnerable for us in Jesus of Nazareth, and it is not possible to be a Christian while refusing to be vulnerable.

I am beginning to see that almost every definition I find of being a Christian is also a definition of being an artist.

And a Christian artist?

We care about what the children see.

We are, ourselves, as little children, and therefore we are vulnerable. We might paraphrase Descartes to read, ‘I hurt, therefore I am.’

And, because of the great affirmation of the Incarnation, we may not give in to despair.

Nor superstition.

Being a Christian, being saved, does not mean that nothing bad is ever going to happen. Terrible things happen to Christians as well as to Hindus and Buddhists and hedonists and atheists. To human beings. When the phone rings at an unexpected hour my heart lurches. I love, therefore I am vulnerable.

When we were children, we used to think that when we were grown-up we would no longer be vulnerable. But to grow up is to accept vulnerability.”

— Madeleine L’Engle, Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art

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